The province is a birding paradise: three migration routes cross over Manitoba, with over 390 species of birds recorded here and 287 known to nest.

Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre

Drive time: 20 minutes
An easy drive from downtown Winnipeg, Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre is home to almost 300 species of birds and is one of the best birding spots in all of Canada. This restored wetland features over 30 kilometres of trails through the marsh. In addition to all the birds - like chickadees, woodpeckers, swans, and owls - keep your eye out for badgers, coyotes, muskrats, and rabbits. Go for a canoe ride and join in a bird-banding expedition, helping the naturalists track the birds on their migration path.

Delta Marsh

Drive time 1.5 hours
Flock like the birds to Delta Marsh, a vast, 18,000-hectare wetland at the southern edge of Lake Manitoba where migratory birds touch down for the unique, marshy terrain and 40 km sandbar of beach ridge. Hundreds of thousands stop here in the spring and fall - among them Forster's terns, piping plovers, warblers, flycatchers, vireos, orioles, goldfinches, red-winged and yellow-headed blackbirds, great blue herons, Wilson's phalaropes, and tundra swans. Summer is best to spot ring-billed, Franklin's, and Bonaparte's gulls, while Forster's, common, and Caspian terns can be found along the eastern sandbars.

Hecla/Grindstone Provincial Park

Drive time: 2.5 hours
Connected to the mainland by a causeway, Hecla Island is well-rounded getaway, featuring a world-class resort and spa, golf course, Icelandic heritage village, and of course over 60 bird species. Follow trails to the lighthouse at the end of the point or through Grassy Narrows Marsh to the viewing towers and blinds. Look for colonial nest birds at Pipestone Rocks. Watch for pelicans, cormorants, sparrows, warblers, and other songbirds, as well as wrens, swallows, woodpeckers, and gulls, with spring and fall migration times offering particularly good viewing.